Monterey 2014 – 5 Days of Automotive Porn – Day 5

Sunday – Concours d’Elegance

Best in Show Ferrari

Jon Shirley’s 1954 Ferrari 375 MM with Coupe body designed and built for Roberto Rossellini by Scaglietti. It placed 1st in Class M1 (Postwar Preservation), and also won the Most Elegant Sports Car Award and Art Center College of Design Award. Its Best in Show selection was the first post-war car to win in 46 years, and the first Ferrari ever to win.

Sometimes we agree with the selection of the Best in Show. In 2008 it was hard to argue against the beautiful 1938 Alfa Romeo 8C 2900B Berlinetta with coachwork by Touring. On the other hand, although its speed record credentials were impressive, the Ab Jenkins Duesenberg “Mormon Meteor” (2007) has to be the ugliest car to ever have won the honor.

This year? Sorry. Yes, it was high time a post-war car won again, and few would deny that Ferrari as a marque was overdue for recognition. Yes, we understand the judges may have more esoteric criteria than ours, but it sure looked as though there were more elegant Ferraris present (even in its own class – ahem! – see below). Anyhow, it’s difficult not to suspect that there was an element of “lifetime achievement award” in the choice of the marque, and somehow this was the best Ferrari they could find on the field.

Glickenhause Dino

James Glickenhause (right in straw hat) proves as accessible as any enthusiast as he answers questions about his unique Postwar Preservation Class 1967 Ferrari Dino Pininfarina Competizione Coupe.

Someone who amasses enough wealth to take a million dollar Ferrari Enzo, throw away the body, and pay Pininfarina another four million to build a tribute to the magnificent Ferrari P3/4 (the Ferrari P4/5 by Pininfarina, below) on the chassis might be expected to be unapproachable, or at the very least impatient with strangers who just walk up to him and his car. Not so, James Glickenhause. Like any enthusiast with a project car, he was eager to answer questions about his unique 1967 Ferrari Dino that was competing in the Postwar Preservation class, the same one that produced the Best in Show car.

Glickenhause Ferrari Pebble 2006

The Glickenhause Ferrari P4/5 by Pininfarina, on the practice green at Pebble Beach 2003.

Other Ferraris

The 250 Testa Rossa (250 cc per cylinder X 12 cylinders = 3,000 cc or three liters) was the Ferrari that dominated sports-racing in the late fifties and early sixties. The name derives from the red wrinkle finish on the cover of the single overhead cams on each cylinder bank.

Testa Rossa Engine Laguna Seca 2004

The origin of the “Testa Rossa” name. Twin banks of six cylinders with single overhead cams covered with cast alloy covers painted in red wrinkle finish. Six dual downdraft Webber carburetors complete the look.

Any driver who was anyone drove one, and they won the 24 Hours of Le Mans outright in 1958, 1960, and 1961. Although rarer than the GTO, they have lagged somewhat behind it in collector lust at auction.

Prototype TestaRossa at Gooding 2011

 Gooding & Co, Pebble Beach 2011. Charley Ross asks “Are we all done?” before dropping the hammer on the 1957 prototype Ferrari Testa Rossa at $14,900,000. Such a price was a record for a car at auction at the time, but that was then.

Testa Rossa Number 38 Ephraim

“The car we’d  most like to drive.” That’s the way Road & Track describes the Ferrari that got their award (the one with the steering wheel). Tom Hartley Jr.’s 1957 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa Scaglietti Spyder number 0704TR also won the REVs program at Stanford award and the FIVA Postwar Trophy. The second prototype, it was raced by such names as Phil Hill, Peter Collins, Olivier Gendebien and Maurice Trintignant. It is the only Testa Rossa to retain its original unrestored body and drive train. Said to be the most valuable car ever sold by a dealer.

Testa Rossa Number 7

John and Gwen McCaw’s 1959 Ferrari 250TR59 Fantuzzi Spyder won Class M3 for Testa Rossas, as well as the Enzo Ferrari Trophy

Special Classes – Ruxton

Ruxton Terra Cota

Edward C. Budd Manufacturing was responsible for the unit chassis of the Citroën Traction Avant, so they were a natural to build the first of the front wheel-drive Ruxtons. These available multicolor paint jobs were the creation of graphic designer Joseph Urban.

The Tucker story is full of narrow escapes, specification instability, publicity hyperbole, and eventual collapse, but it’s child’s play compared to the machinations behind the first commercial front-wheel-drive cars in America, the stunningly low Ruxton. Archie Molton Andrews was the businessman behind William J. Muller’s design. Andrews had no factory, and such was the atmosphere of distrust around him that he went through Budd, Hupp (Think Huppmobile.), Kissel and Moon to get fewer than a hundred cars built. Of the 19 said to survive, 16 were at Pebble Beach.

Ruxton Lit

Although available on other cars as options, Woodlight headlamps, standard equipment on the Ruxton, became a trademark. Here they light the way up the cart path by the Lodge at Pebble Beach for Petersen Automotive Museum Curator Leslie Kendall as he wheels the Museum’s rare 1929 Ruxton C Baker-Rauling Roadster up to the 18th Fairway in the pre-dawn Monterey mist.

Special Classes – Streamlined Tatra

Tatra K-01

The very definition of the “odd duck,” the aerodynamic Czech Tatras of the immediate pre-war era not only looked strange but also incorporated a rear-mounted alloy air-cooled V8 to maximize interior space. Its slick body allowed it to reach 90 mph on only three liters. This is Pavel Kasik’s 1936 T77, brought all the way from Prague. It won the Streamlined Tatra Class K.

Other Favorites

XK-120 Record Car

In the early fifties, Jaguar carried on a campaign to retain the title of “World’s Fastest Production Car.” It started in 1949 with the second XK120 built. With a few minor modifications it set the record at an official 132.596 mph. In 1953 a Pegaso Z-102 set a new mark at 151.042. In response,  Jaguar used this aerodynamically cleaned-up car, with its bolt-down bubble canopy, to recapture the record with a speed of 172.412 mph. It won Kurt Englehorn of St. Moritz first in Postwar Sports Racing Class O1, and the Montagu of Beaulieu Trophy.

Duesenberg Limo

With no 4WD, Duesenberg never built a real SUV, but this is close. With 400 hp from its twin-carburetor version of the supercharged SJ engine, this 1934 Rollston Limousine of Cedar Grove, New Jersey’s Sonny and Joan Abagnale is ready for serious touring.

Saoutchik Bentley

Double winners, John and Gwen McCaw’s 1929 Bentley Speed Six got a 1st Place Trophy in class J1 for Early European Classics to go with their Testa Rossa Class win. The chrome flourishes and blue livery are hints of its French coachwork by Soutchik. With 6.6 liters, 5.3:1 compression (up from 4.4:1), single overhead cam, four valves per cylinder, two carburetors, and dual ignition, these cars were indeed built for speed, with racing versions winning Le Mans in 1929 and 1930.

1933 Auburn 12-165 Salon Speedster 02

When a Ford cost $500, a luxurious Auburn Salon Speedster with a V12 for $1,275 was a galloping bargain! Bill and Barbara Parfet of Hickory Corners (You can’t make this stuff up!), Michigan won American Classics Open Class C-1 with this 1933 example

HRH Rolls

Peeking out from behind the Pebble Beach Placard, the number plate hints at the intended passenger of this 1970 Rolls Royce Phantom VI Mulliner Landaulette, exhibited by Stephen F. Brauer of Saint Louis. Her Royal Majesty got side tracked in Australia and never used it their but Lady Margaret Thatcher did, for the 50th Anniversary of Winston Churchill’s “Iron Curtain” speech at Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri.

The Tour start, the static display at Carmel, and the Concours itself are wonderful opportunities for mascot hunters. Below, clockwise from upper left: The Ruxton Griffin, a golden version of the traditional Rolls-Royce Spirit of Ecstasy or “Flying Lady,” a less traditional (and less modest) interpretation of the Rolls mascot, a Cadillac attempt at a flying lady, and the traditional Duesenberg Art Deco “Flight.” 

Mascots

Silver Dawn with Insets

With its wealth of intriguing details, impeccable presentation, and history, the 1914 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost Portholm Alpine Touring of Steven and Susan Littin (That’s her with the polishing cloth.) was my favorite car at the Concours. This is the car (chassis anyway – that’s its third body, probably why it was skunked in the awards) that James Radley drove in the 1914 London-Edinburgh Alpine Trials.

Ferrari and CHP - PCH Monday

For those of us visiting Monterey from Southern California, the action is not over when the last hammer falls at the Gooding & Co. Auction on Sunday night. There’s a perfectly good freeway 24 miles up highway 68 at Salinas, but with US1, one of the world’s great driving roads, going right through Monterey, there’s really only one choice. That is, unless you’re driving a Ferrari and your luck runs out.

Carma is a publication of
The OM Dude Press
a service of
Options in Mobility

Author, Editor, Publisher, Reporter, Historian, Archivist:
Dick Stewart.

All photographs are by the Author unless otherwise indicated.

Click on the images to view more detail. If the cursor is a plus sign in a circle, clicking again will yield full resolution.

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About carmacarcounselor

I'm one of those people that friends call "that car guy," except I've made it into a profession. Since 1988 when a friend found my help in choosing, finding, and negotiating for a new car was worth a fee, I've helped countless people, listening to their car questions and challenges, and helping with their car purchases, insulating them from the adversarial process that is the new car retail model today. Their word of mouth is my only publicity. My newsletter CARMA won the description "The clear crystal ring of truth" from award-winning automotive journalist Denise McCluggage. Now I'm going global!
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